Wednesday, August 29, 2012

What a tangled web...

What a tangled web I weave when I write too many scenes I thought were funny, just what the story needed, or worse yet, ramble on and on, trying to add those needed scenes, until I'm hopelessly caught in my web of ideas, that are no where near the level of perfection I imagined them to be. In my head, every plot line looks perfect as a flawlessly spun web. Completely thought and plotted out, not a thread out of place: boy meets girl, they fall in love, and live happily ever after, (not quite like that, but you get my meaning).
File:SpiderWeb.jpg
Author~Michael Hartl ~Permission=Public domain 
So how come in reality, I have over 150 pages that look like the cables under my desk? Why don't my words didn't just flow from my head to the pages in the perfectness of my original thoughts? I think I need one of those links, like in the matrix, so everything could just be downloaded to the page. Or maybe not. Maybe hooking a node up to my brain would only be worse. In addition to my story and plot lines, I'd end up with 500 pages that included my grocery list, errands, overdue library books trips to the doctor, vet, etc., etc,. etc. *Sigh* All this thinking is making it worse.
What I need is the perfect plot plan. I've read many books, blogs, and articles, used a gazillion plot outlines, formats, rubrics, all to end up right back where I started with a bunch of messy cables.


I know the answer is out there. I've read too many stories that ended with the coveted happily ever after. What I need to know is, how did they do it? What is it that allows the web to be woven tangle free? How do you do it? How did you weave the perfect web (storyline) that traps the reader like the fly to the spider?


10 comments:

S.P. Bowers said...

I wish I had some good advice for you. I'm afraid I did it the hard way. I had a bunch of tangled lines and I sat down and untangled them. I moved scenes around, moved them back, rewrote, rewrote some more. It took forever and I hope I can think things through a little more for my next book. It was worth it though. Sometimes you just have to jump in. Good luck!

michelle said...

I'm just starting out with a MS, so I don't have too much experience. However you have asked the million dollar question... please share when you get the answer.

Scribbles From Jenn said...

Thanks S. P., at least I know I'm on the same track as everyone else. Hopefully, this track is headed where I need to go.

Scribbles From Jenn said...

Good luck Michelle. Should I find the key, I'll be sure to share.

Marian Allen said...

I'm like S.P. I just have to write through, tangled wires and all, until I come to the end. Then I have to go back and "make it purty". There are index cards involved. And story boards. And many colors of felt-tip pen.

Oh, and coffee. Lots of coffee.

Marian Allen
Fantasies, mysteries, comedies, recipes

Heather Murphy said...

I agree that this is a popular question with many writers. I have thought that it might be easier to start with the ending, and write backwards. Write how you want it to end, then figure out how to get there. Just a thought. I haven't tried it yet but I have considered it

Rosalind Adam said...

When you find the answer can you let me know too? That's exactly what I'm battling with right now. As for that last picture. It's making me feel just a little uneasy because that's how my mind is feeling! Aaaagh!

Nick Wilford said...

It's really hard, especially when shoving scenes around just seems to lead to a bigger mess. I'm in rewrites too and I need an answer!

Magical Mystical MiMi said...

I use note cards and a cork board that way I can arrange and re-arrange, write and re-write and just put cards behind cards, pull out the ones I need and keep rearranging until I see the story pop out at me.. Don't know if that makes sense..

Lynn Proctor said...

i am not good at untangling lines of any kind :)

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